Sunday Summary is my attempt to look back on the week, see what inspired me, reflect on what I learned, and start a catalog of the things that are important to me.  Hopefully you will find some value here as well. The concept was derived from Harold Jarche and his Friday Finds blog post.

This week it’s all about engagement: for learning, for morale and for culture.

The Finds:

  • Engagement for learning: A blog post by Clark Quinn via Feedly on the word engagement.
  • Engagement for morale: A blog post on using social media to boost employee morale in Incentive Magazine found on twitter:

  • Engagement for culture: A blog post by Ben Carmel on reaching out and helping a lost coworker via Feedly.

Summary (aka reminders to myself)

  • Engagement means different things in different contexts:  Since “buzz” words are so easy to throw out,  we all need to be clear on the term and what it actually means in a given situation before using it in into a conversation.
  • In engagement for learning –“strip away any ‘nice to have’ or unnecessary info.  Lean is engaging!:”  Clark hit the nail on the head with this one and for me, remembering that less is more is important.  There’s a reason microlearning is taking off.
  • In engagement for morale – “Develop authentic relationships whereby workers see themselves as something more the a cog in the profit producing wheel.”  I like Incentives definition. I believe that relationships are the key to helping employees feel more engaged in the workplace and that social media and social learning are two very important components in making this happen.
  • In engagement for culture –” workplaces are only as good as our culture, and a lackluster culture should be addressed head on, with positivity and passion, but also with techniques that engage.”   My favorite tip from Ben is using autonomy as a key technique in changing culture. He states: “This is the flip side of trust. Grant as much autonomy as you can, and trust that people will find their productive way.” In other words – micro-managing sucks your soul ; )