Day 2 of I/ITSEC: A Reflection

Day 2 was all about paper sessions, where author’s presented research, experiments and concepts they had conducted or developed over the year. The paper’s are free for the reminder of 2017 so I will just share a few quick thoughts/takeaways on two of my favorites.  You can find Day 1’s reflection here.

Also, in the interest of working out loud, I curated some articles from a few other session I attended at the end of this post to support several projects my colleges are interested in working on.

Increasing Cognitive Readiness in Joint Command Battle Staff

Abstract: Biever, J.D, Reitz, E.A. (2017). Increasing Cognitive Readiness in Joint Command Battle Staff, In Proceedings of the Interservice/Industry Training, Simulation and Education Conference, 2017. I/ITSEC, Orlando, FL.

Collective high level cognitive skills are becoming more and more important in dealing with the complexity of and rapidly changing work environment and this research provides a great framework to help measure how effective groups are at using higher-level cognitive skills. I am inspired to try to use and adapt this research to help measure a groups critical thinking, problem solving, anticipation, agility, and adaptiveness skills in several upcoming learning & development programs I am supporting.

Black Swan: Disruption of Power

Abstract: Reitz, E.A., Stodd. J (2017). Black Swan: Disruption of Power, In Proceedings of the Interservice/Industry Training, Simulation and Education Conference, 2017. I/ITSEC, Orlando, FL.

I have been exploring the field of social leadership and what I like to think of as “disruption” of formal power systems in organizations to foster change for a while and  wanted to get a pulse on how very formal organizations, such as the militarily, are feeling about these concepts.

If the amount of people and types of people in the room was any indication, I would say they get it or at least realize that formal power structures are not the way to solve the complex problems the world is facing.  They are starting to clearly see that the power of social networks are a key to how we can start to address these problems.

In addition, I took away this little nugget on ways to explain types of cultural alignment.

  • Primary Cultural alignment being what happens in the first few days/hours where you learn the rituals and patterns of your team and;
  • Secondary Cultural alignment being about mastering the complexity of how local and global teams relate to each to get things done.

Having been with my current organization for over 10 years, I clearly see this secondary cultural alignment as I have learned to navigate it. Colleagues often seek me out because I just “know” who to talk to and how to get things done with in our formal system. However, this was not a fast process and has taken a lot of self-directed effort on my part.

I see one of biggest our challenges to solving problems and driving innovation is finding a way to speed the process of secondary cultural navigation/alignment up.  This is why I truly believe in the power of social leadership, working out loud, and personal knowledge mastery. It can provide us map to navigate an organization’s cultural waters.

Curation Corner

Here are a few other sessions I attended to support my colleges with notes on why they (and you) might want to review these articles. You can search for them here: http://www.iitsecdocs.com/search 

  • Phillips, K., Ross, Karol., Rosopa, P., (2017) Assessment Instruments in Support of Marine Instructor Development, In Proceedings of the Interservice/Industry Training, Simulation and Education Conference, 2017. I/ITSEC, Orlando, FL.
    • Why Review: This research would be handy for anyone seeking a methodology to increase time to competnency for instructors The research also provides several instruments that can be modified to assess instructor effectiveness.
  • Mundy, Daisy., (2017). Leading Learning in the Workplace – Who’s in Charge, In Proceedings of the Interservice/Industry Training, Simulation and Education Conference, 2017. I/ITSEC, Orlando, FL.
    • Why Review: This research done for the U.K. Ministry of Defense would be handy for anyone seeking to understand the behaviors associated with those who lead learning and have successfully built/supported a learning culture. The research provides a methodology for conduction your own research and provides some suggestions for promoting commitment to learning.

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