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Sunday Summary

Sunday Summary: Growing Leaders

Sunday Summary is my attempt to look back on the week, see what inspired me, reflect on what I learned, and start a catalog of the things that are important to me.  Hopefully you will find some value here as well. The concept was derived from Harold Jarche and his Friday Finds blog post.

Work Out Loud Note: I’m still figuring out (fighting with) blog  technology so this is my interim format fix for my Sunday Summary.

Weekly Favorite Finds

Head on over to my ScoopIt page to see my favorite finds for the week (it’s filtered to show only this weeks adds).

This Weeks Learning Adventure

It all started with an article where my CEO stated that:

For a leader to grow, they need to embrace the power of diversity in how they advance themselves along with the team around them.

The words”diversity in how they advance” got me thinking about how this happens through things like social leadership, social learning, and personal knowledge management.

This is where something clicked for me. There is a “glue” that ties all these things together: the leveraging of expertise inside and outside the organization.

But how do you find it I asked?  

You read Julian Stodds article on 11 Key questions on authority and expertise to help identify where expertise lies and how we engage with it.

Well than, what needs to happen first to support the leveraging of expertise?  

You must have a supportive culture as pointed out by Sahana Chattopadhyay who offers a few suggestions on changes organizations need to make to embrace social collaborative learning.

So, how do we build an environment that embraces things like social collaborative learning?

You build an intelligent enterprise using the building blocks provided by Harold Jarche:

intelligent-enterprise-2

Note: I would add social leadership to Harold’s networked leadership as the social leadership “model” also makes sense to me as a way to build “networked leadership.”

All easier said then done but this is what will keep us all employed ; )

 Summary (aka reminders to myself)

  • Write it (or sketch it) out:  This is the perfect way to make the things you are learning and struggling with make sense.  It doesn’t matter if it’s wrong.  You can fix it later ; )

Sunday Summary: Switch it Up

Sunday Summary is my attempt to look back on the week, see what inspired me, reflect on what I learned, and start a catalog of the things that are important to me.  Hopefully you will find some value here as well. The concept was derived from Harold Jarche and his Friday Finds blog post.

The Finds

It’s time for me to switch it up a bit.  Everything is in constant beta and so is my Sunday Summary post methodology.

This week I started a ScoopIt page. It’s one way I’m sharing with my co-workers what I am learning when I am conducting research on learning and development trends.  Once I got started, I realized it was similar to what I was doing with my Sunday Summaries here on the blog and started to play around with how I could integrate the two.

Unfortunately wordpress.com and embedded ScoopIt code do not play nicely with each other (ugh technology – love it until it doesn’t work).  The good news is that wordpress.org does play nicely with embedded code so I think I will be transitioning this blog to one with wordpress.org so I have more flexibility.

Or – maybe not.  Who knows what will happen once I start experimenting ; )

In the meantime, while I am a busy breaking and cursing at technology, I’m going to point you over to my ScoopIt page so you can see what I learned this week:

http://www.scoop.it/t/rustic-learning

Summary (aka reminders to myself)

  • Having a PKM routine is good but don’t get so caught up in it that you can’t switch it up!

Sunday Summary: Letting Go

Sunday Summary is my attempt to look back on the week, see what inspired me, reflect on what I learned, and start a catalog of the things that are important to me.  Hopefully you will find some value here as well. The concept was derived from Harold Jarche and his Friday Finds blog post.

The Finds

I am a pretty avid follower of Harold Jarche and Jane Hart as they really encourage me to dig deep and explore my assumptions.  This week they both posted articles on their blog that got my attention because of a project I am working on where I’m struggling to not “control learning but provide a framework to let it happen:

L&D doesn’t own social learning … we all do

What struck me from Jane’s post was this:

“The power of social technologies in organisations lies in how they can underpin the natural social learning that happens continuously as a part of daily work in teams and groups. So the real value comes in helping teams and groups make use of these social tools to support this continuous social learning”

Its just another reminder to me that we can’t control learning, especially social learning.  As L&D professionals we have been trained to  to jump in and take over the instant someone mentions the word “learning” but really  it’s not always about us. Sometimes we just need to let people find their own path. A lesson I also learned from Harold Jarche this week.

Nobody pays attention

Harold’s post caught my attention when he stated:

“On this blog I have taken many half-baked ideas and worked at simplifying convoluted concepts over several years. But readers will take one point and run with it, taking it where they wish. I am not in control. They are.”

This is a great reminder that even if we thought (or still think) we have control over learning or what people do with our content, we never really did.  Why?  Because we are dealing with people and you can’t control people.  As Harold puts it: “All I can hope is to engage them. Over time I may even be able to convince them of a new idea.”

Summary (aka reminders to myself)

  • Let it go

 

 

Sunday Summary: PKM & Employee Advocacy for Culture Change

Sunday Summary is my attempt to look back on the week, reflect on what I learned, and start a catalog of the things that are important to me. Hopefully you will find some value here as well. The concept was derived from Harold Jarche and his Friday Finds blog post.

The Finds

This week, I invested my personal knowledge management time in meetings with two people I follow on Twitter. Below are my takeaways from those conversations.

Lunch with Ben Carmel

I meet Ben via twitter and since we live close we decided to meet face to face. We talked about the learning and development industry as well as our love of personal knowledge management.

Ben and I both work in industries that are dominated by requirements not controlled by our organizations. So our conversation quickly turned to culture change and how hard it is in these types of environments.  Which is where I got my “ah-ah” moment: PKM is the perfect “tool” for supporting culture change in both your organization and those you interact with. It spreads the word, it forces you to question your assumptions and provides a way for you to try new ways of doing things.

Happy Hour with Emily Kellet

Emily  reached out to me after she saw how I was engaging with the content TrapIt provides on content marketing, employee advocacy and social selling.

My conversion with Emily surrounded how employee advocacy is not just about sales and marketing.  It’s also a way to drive employee engagement and productivity.

What I concluded from our conversation is that Employee Advocacy is a way to help drive PKM practices in organizations. Which would help in driving the culture change we need to embed learning in work.

Summary (AKA reminders to myself)

  • Social Media is a great way to build your personal learning network but don’t under estimate the value in an old fashioned networking meeting. ; )

Sunday Summary: Debates and Change Management in L&D

Sunday Summary is my attempt to look back on the week, see what inspired me, reflect on what I learned, and start a catalog of the things that are important to me.  Hopefully you will find some value here as well. The concept was derived from Harold Jarche and his Friday Finds blog post.

The Finds

Kirkpatrick model: Good or Bad?

I came across this in my twitter feed just before the event started and I am so glad I did. Not because of the topic, which is interesting by the way, but because it is so awesome to see a live debate.  It’s a lost art and one that we should bring back to the L&D profession.

Digital hives: Creating a surge around change

One of my takeaways from Learning & Performance EcoSystems was the need for non-traditional ways to manage change.  In typical twitter fashion, this article floated into my feed on creation of digital “hives” using online communities to help companies engage with employees and accelerate change. Here’s what got my mind turning:

Digital “hives”—electronic hubs bristling with collective activity and designed to solve a particular problem or set of problems, to drive new habits, and to encourage organizational change.”

My takeaways (aka reminders to myself)

  • Don’t shy away from debate: It’s a key way to challenge assumptions and shift  thinking.  They ability to respectively disagree, clearly communicate ones thoughts, and be open to shift your thinking will become key skills as we try to revolutionize L&D.
  • Start from the bottom up:  Don’t always look to leadership and management to drive & support change. The best people to solve problems, drive new habits, and encourage change are those that are actually doing the work.

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